• April 2013
  • Vol. 14, No. 3

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Safe, Stable, and Nurturing Relationships

Safe, stable, and nurturing relationships (SSNRs) are paramount to healthy child development and preventing child maltreatment. To help concerned individuals and communities promote these healthy relationships and environments, a new guide offers evidence-based strategies for helping children grow and thrive.

The guide, produced by the National Center for Injury Prevention, Division of Violence Prevention, within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is organized into four sections that reflect the goals and subsequent steps necessary for community action:

  • Raise Awareness and Commitment to Promote SSNRs and Prevent Child Maltreatment
  • Use Data to Inform Actions
  • Create the Context for Healthy Children and Families Through Norms Change and Programs
  • Create the Context for Healthy Children and Families Through Policies

The scope of child maltreatment is discussed, and common types of abuse are defined. Similarly, the guide describes each component of SSNRs and provides insight into why SSNRs are so important to a child's well-being. The authors reiterate that while child maltreatment is a pervasive public health concern, it is preventable with the help of communities that are committed to fostering nurturing relationships and safe neighborhoods where today's children and future generations can flourish.

Essentials for Childhood: Steps to Create Safe, Stable, and Nurturing Relationships and other related documents are available on the CDC website:

http://www.cdc.gov/ViolencePrevention/childmaltreatment/essentials/index.html

Related Item:

Essentials for Childhood: Steps to Create Safe, Stable, and Nurturing Relationships is also part of the Public Health Leadership for Child Maltreatment Prevention Initiative toolkit, which was developed to aid State health departments in their child maltreatment prevention efforts. The toolkit and related items are accessible on the VetoViolence website:

http://vetoviolence.cdc.gov/childmaltreatment/phl/index.html

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