• May 2013
  • Vol. 14, No. 4

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Annual State Child Welfare Expenditures

Each year, States are required by the Social Security Act to submit to Congress a report of planned and actual spending for child welfare programs. The law also requires the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to synthesize the information and provide national totals for spending from the Stephanie Tubbs Jones Child Welfare Services Program (title IV-B, subpart 1) and the Promoting Safe and Stable Families Program (title IV-B, subpart 2). The most recent numbers have been made available in the Annual Report to Congress on State Child Welfare Expenditures Reported on the CFS-101: 2012.

For fiscal year (FY) 2012, estimated expenditures for the Stephanie Tubbs Jones Child Welfare Services Program included the following: 

  • Protective services would receive one-third (32 percent) of the funds.
  • Family preservation services would receive 28 percent of the funds.
  • Preventive and support services would receive about 13 percent of the funds.
  • Time-limited reunification services would receive 11 percent.
  • Just over 10 percent of funding was estimated for foster care maintenance payments, and States planned to spend just over 5 percent on administrative costs. The law requires that not more than 10 percent be spent on administrative costs.

Promoting Safe and Stable Families estimates for FY 2012 included:

  • Family preservation would receive approximately 25 percent of funds.
  • Prevention/ family support services would receive about 23 percent of the funds.
  • Time-limited reunification services and adoption promotion and support services were slated to receive 21 percent.
  • Just under 6 percent was estimated for administrative costs, and another 4 percent was categorized as "other."

The annual report also includes actual State expenditures for these programs for FY 2009. Annual Report to Congress on State Child Welfare Expenditures Reported on the CFS-101: 2012 is available on the website for the Administration for Children and Families:

http://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/cb/cfs_101_report_to_congress_for_2012.pdf  (567 KB)

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