• February 2015
  • Vol. 16, No. 1

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Services for Families Affected by Parental Methamphetamine Use

In order to improve services and outcomes for children and families affected by parental methamphetamine use and other substance use disorders who are also involved with child welfare and the family court, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT) awarded funds to expand services to these families. The grants were awarded in October 2010 to 12 grantees in seven States as part of CSAT's Grants to Expand Services to Children Affected by Methamphetamine in Families Participating in Family Treatment Drug Court (also known as the Children Affected by Methamphetamine [CAM] grant program).

The grant program's goal was to provide direct services to children and youth, ages 0 to 17, and support services to parents, caregivers, and families. Additionally, because these services addressed a multitude of issues—such as child abuse and neglect, co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders, prenatal substance exposure, parent-child bonding and attachment issues, and multigenerational trauma—cross-system collaboration was essential to effectively meet the varied and complex needs of these families.

At the culmination of the CAM grant program in September 2014, SAMHSA developed a brief that provides an overview of the grant program and the 12 grantees; summaries of grantees' experiences; lessons learned; implications for the field; and the interim safety, permanency, recovery, and well-being outcomes of the 1,850 families served during the grant's first 3 years. A number of tables and graphs accompany text and enforce the preliminary findings that CAM participants experienced positive outcomes.

The November 2014 SAMHSA brief Grants to Expand Services to Children Affected by Methamphetamine in Families Participating in Family Treatment Drug Court is available at http://www.cffutures.org/files/publications/CAM_Brief_2014.pdf (936 KB).
 

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