• November 2015
  • Vol. 16, No. 8

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Self-Regulation and Toxic Stress

The Center for Child and Social Policy at Duke University is developing a set of four reports about self-regulation and toxic stress. Self-regulation is managing cognition and emotion to support goal-directed actions (e.g., organizing behavior, controlling impulses), and toxic stress can occur when children experience strong, frequent, or sustained adversity that overwhelms their skills or support. The reports were commissioned by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. The Center for Child and Social Policy has written and released two of the reports:

  • Self-Regulation and Toxic Stress: Foundations for Understanding Self-Regulation From an Applied Developmental Perspective
  • Self-Regulation and Toxic Stress: A Review of Ecological, Biological, and Developmental Studies of Self-Regulation and Stress

The other reports will be titled Self-Regulation and Toxic Stress: A Comprehensive Review of Self-Regulation Interventions From Birth Through Young Adulthood and Self-Regulation and Toxic Stress: Implications for Programs and Practice.

A description of the project and the available reports can be accessed at http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/research/project/toxic-stress-and-self-regulation-reports.
 

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