• August 2016
  • Vol. 17, No. 6

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State-by-State Snapshot of Early Childhood Homelessness

The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) published a report that explores data related to children experiencing homelessness in 50 States plus the District of Columbia (excluding territories, migrant, and Tribal information). Its key message is that homelessness in early childhood is related to poor development outcomes. Supporting research indicates that the effects of homelessness are correlated with educational, brain structure, and social emotional development, both while children are experiencing homelessness and throughout the remainder of their lifetimes.

This report addresses the importance of easily identifiable supports to homeless children's long-term educational outcomes. These supports can counteract deficits generated by experiences of homelessness in areas such as the following:

  • Learning
  • Social-emotional development
  • Self-regulation
  • Cognitive skills

The purpose of presenting these individual State data profiles, according to the Office of Early Childhood Development at ACF, is to help inform local, State, and Federal conversations and initiatives working toward ending family homelessness by 2020. In addition to an overarching national profile page, plus the individual State profiles, this report contains appendices on these ancillary topics:

  • Appendix 1: An overview of Federal definitions of homelessness and related issues
  • Appendix 2: Background about supportive Early Childhood Programs
  • Appendix 3: A list of data sources consulted and the methodology employed to undertake this study
  • Appendix 4: Limitations in the data studied to compile this report

Access Early Childhood Homelessness in the United States: 50-State Profile on the ACF website at https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/ecd/homelessness_profile_package_with_blanks_for_printing_508.pdf (4 MB).
 

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