• October 2018
  • Vol. 19, No. 8

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Special Journal Issue Highlights the Public Health Model of Child Maltreatment Prevention

Child maltreatment is a major public health concern in the United States. Children who have experienced maltreatment often suffer long-term consequences to their emotional and physical health, including an increased risk for mental and behavioral health issues as well as chronic and sometimes life-threatening conditions, such as heart and lung disease, diabetes, and certain forms of cancer. These consequences highlight the growing need for child welfare services and the increasing societal costs of these services.

The journal Trauma, Violence, & Abuse published a special issue focusing on the need for primary prevention within a public health model, which centers on dealing with population-level or pervasive health concerns in a community-based, coordinated way. The articles in the issue address topics such as primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention programs designed specifically for younger children but that can also be applied to older children; a three-pronged approach to prevention that incorporates knowledge development, community engagement, and program sustainability; an evaluation of the Triple-P intervention; and the similarities between the fields of injury prevention and child maltreatment prevention and what can be learned for community-level interventions and child welfare engagement.

The special issue, titled "The Public Health Model of Child Maltreatment Prevention" and edited by Todd I. Herrenkohl, Rebecca T. Leeb, and Daryl Higgins, is available at http://journals.sagepub.com/toc/tvaa/17/4.
 

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