• October 2002
  • Vol. 3, No. 8

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Children Cared for by Relatives: What Do We Know about Their Well-Being?

Children Cared for by Relatives: What Do We Know about Their Well-Being? is part of a series by The Urban Institute presenting findings from the 1999 National Survey of America's Families, a nationally representative survey of 44,000 households. The authors provide an overview of the well-being of children in kinship care families. They reveal that "…children living with relatives fare worse than children living with their parents on most measures of behavioral, emotional, and physical well-being." The authors detail areas where children in kinship care fare worse, the same, or, in a few cases, better than their counterparts living with their parents. For example, children in kinship care are more likely to be suspended or expelled from school, but have comparable activity involvement and are equally likely to skip school.

The authors outline several areas for further development to provide support for families involved in kinship care.

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