• October 2002
  • Vol. 3, No. 8

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Justice Department Announces More Than $14 Million To Mentor At-Risk Youth

The Justice Department is awarding more than $14 million in grants to fund juvenile mentoring programs across the nation. Through the Juvenile Mentoring Program (JUMP), administered by the Office of Justice Programs' Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), more than 5,000 at-risk youth in 38 states and the District of Columbia will receive one-to-one mentoring aimed at keeping them in school and away from drugs and crime.

The 3-year grants range from $156,000 to $220,000 each.

"Experts tell us that the single greatest factor in helping a child avoid delinquent behavior is a strong, caring relationship with an adult," said Deborah J. Daniels, Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Justice Programs. "Over the past 9 years, those caring relationships have been provided at over 200 JUMP-funded sites in 47 States, and we're pleased to add these 66 new programs to that total."

OJJDP selected the new sites through a competitive review process from a pool of 863 applicants. The mentoring sites will focus on three major goals: improved academic performance, reduced school dropout rates, and prevention of delinquent behavior. All sites are required to coordinate their activities with local educational agencies. Among the youth participating in the projects will be children of incarcerated parents, minority youth, Native Americans, children in foster care, youth in special education, and homeless youth. Sites will recruit a wide range of mentors, including military personnel, college students, faith-based representatives, business professionals, Tribal leaders, and law enforcement personnel.

For more information on the Office of Justice Programs, see their website at http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov.

A press release on the grant program, including the attached list of grantees and award amounts, can be found at http://ojjdp.ncjrs.org/about/press/ojp020918.html. (Editor's note: this link is no longer available.)

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