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Children's Bureau ExpressMarch 2017 | Vol. 18, No. 1

Table of Contents
 

Spotlight on Opioid/Substance Use Treatment and Services
Opioid and substance misuse is a widespread concern that affects many youth, families, and communities. March's CBX highlights information on opioid and substance use as well as support services and treatment options for overcoming the devastating consequences of addiction.

  • Surgeon General Releases Report on Substance Misuse
  • Webinar Series Focuses on Maternal Opioid Use Disorders
  • Opioid Addiction Treatment Guide for Families

News From the Children's Bureau
We highlight the latest Child Maltreatment report; an article from the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation that reports on the outcomes of the Personal Responsibility Education Program to address teen pregnancy; and a video from the National Quality Improvement Center for Adoption and Guardianship Support and Preservation on the challenges to achieving favorable outcomes and permanence for youth in foster care.

  • Child Maltreatment 2015 Report Released
  • Addressing Teen Pregnancy Using an Implementation Infrastructure
  • QIC-AG Project Videos: Child Welfare in the 21st Century
  • Funding Opportunity Announcement
  • CB Website Updates

Child Welfare Research
Read about community cafés in Alaska that facilitated discussions on the Strengthening Families program and how to inform and improve the State's family support services, as well as a survey on the state of the child protection workforce in Minnesota.

  • Community Cafés in Alaska Discuss Strengthening Families Initiative
  • Study Examines Stability of Minnesota Child Protection Workforce

Strategies and Tools for Practice
This section of CBX offers publications, articles, reports, toolkits, and other instruments that provide either evidence-based strategies or other concrete help to child welfare and related professionals.

  • Enhancing Evidence-Building and Documentation Skills for Program Evaluation
  • New Workforce Development Toolkit

Resources
This CBX section provides a quick list of interesting resources, such as websites, videos, journals, funding or scholarship opportunities, or other materials that can be used in the field or with families.

  • Top 10 Tips for Engaging Youth
  • An Introduction to Financial Capability for Youth

Training and Conferences

  • Center for Juvenile Justice Reform Hosts 2017 LEAD Conference
  • Webinar Focuses on Racial Equity in the Child Welfare Workforce
  • Conferences

Spotlight on Opioid/Substance Use Treatment and Services

Surgeon General Releases Report on Substance Misuse

Alcohol and drug misuse is a serious and widespread issue in the United States that can lead to devastating consequences for individuals, families, and communities. In 2015, 66.7 million Americans reported binge drinking in the past month, and 27.1 million Americans reported current illicit drug use or misuse of prescription medications, costing the country $400 billion a year for crime management, health care, and lost productivity. For this reason, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Office of the Surgeon General issued a call to action with the report Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General's Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health.

Facing Addiction in America describes a comprehensive approach aimed at policymakers, health-care professionals, and the public for combatting substance misuse and its consequences in the United States. The report outlines five key components:

The report also covers the neurobiology of substance use, misuse, and addiction; prevention models, programs, and policies; early intervention and treatment; pathways to recovery; how health-care systems deal with substance use disorders; and more.

Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General's Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health is available at https://addiction.surgeongeneral.gov/surgeon-generals-report.pdf (27,570 KB).
 

Issue Date: March 2017
Section: Spotlight on Opioid/Substance Use Treatment and Services
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=184&articleid=4899


Webinar Series Focuses on Maternal Opioid Use Disorders

The National Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare (NCSACW), in partnership with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and the Children's Bureau, produced a number of webinars focusing on the issue of maternal opioid use disorders and pregnancy. Parts 1 and 2 of "Medication-Assisted Treatment and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome" highlight a new publication, A Collaborative Approach to the Treatment of Pregnant Women With Opioid Use Disorders: Practice and Policy Recommendations for Child Welfare, Collaborating Medical and Service Providers, which is intended to support and provide resources and tools for developing collaborative practice among the primary systems (i.e., States, Tribes, and communities) that come into contact with pregnant women with opioid use disorders and their infants and families.

This new publication—which has a wide-ranging audience, including child welfare workers, substance use treatment providers, medication-assisted treatment providers, and neonatologists—reports on the findings of a national working group of 40 professionals from across various systems. The participants of the working group met on a regular basis over a 2-year period to determine promising and best practices for pregnant women with opioid use disorders and their infants and families. The document was also largely informed by the experiences of the six sites discussed in part two of the webinar, "Partnering to Treat Pregnant Women With Opioid Disorders: Lessons Learned From a Six Site Initiative."

The six sites discussed in part two are Connecticut, Kentucky, Minnesota, New Jersey, Virginia, and West Virginia. Part two begins with an overview of the Substance-Exposed Infants In-Depth Technical Assistance Initiative, the purpose of which is to strengthen the collaborative capacity of sites to improve the safety, health, and well-being of substance-exposed infants and the recovery of pregnant and parenting women and their families. The methods and findings of each State are then discussed in-depth.

The webinar, "Opioid Use in Pregnancy: A Community's Approach: The Children and Recovering Mothers (CHARM) Collaborative," highlights the goals of the CHARM collaborative, which are to improve the health and safety of babies born to mothers with opioid use disorder. The four targets of this goal are to (1) encourage early prenatal care, (2) reduce cravings and withdrawal using medication-assisted treatment, (3) engage women in substance use counseling, and (4) provide social support and basic needs referrals for the family.

The full webinars are available at https://ncsacw.samhsa.gov/resources/videos-and-webinars/webinars.aspx#medication.

Related Item  

NCSACW and the Administration for Children and Families released the guide A Collaborative Approach to the Treatment of Pregnant Women With Opioid Use Disorders. The guide presents specific information on the treatment of pregnant women with opioid use disorders, approaches implemented by organizations across multiple disciplines, a framework to organize these approaches in communities, and a practice guide for community planning. Read more in November's Children's Bureau Express.
 

Issue Date: March 2017
Section: Current Theme or Topic
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=184&articleid=4901


Opioid Addiction Treatment Guide for Families

According to the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), addiction is a prevalent chronic disease with no cure that affects people from all walks of life, their families, and their communities. Although opioid addiction has no cure, much like other chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease, there are safe treatment options available that can lead to a healthier way of life known as recovery. ASAM's pamphlet, Opioid Addiction Treatment: A Guide for Parents, Families and Friends, illustrates the path toward successful treatment.

The pamphlet outlines approaches to treatment, beginning with assessment and diagnosis; a list of medications currently in use for treating addiction disorders, such as naltrexone and methadone; how to recognize and respond to opioid overdose, such as using Naloxone at the first signs of an overdose; and a list of questions to ask a clinician, such as "Are opioid treatment medications addictive?".

Dos and don'ts for responding to an opioid overdose also are included.

Opioid Addiction Treatment: A Guide for Parents, Families and Friends is available at http://eguideline.guidelinecentral.com/i/706017-asam-opioid-patient-piece.
 

Issue Date: March 2017
Section: Current Theme or Topic
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=184&articleid=4902


News From the Children's Bureau

Child Maltreatment 2015 Report Released

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services released the 26th report in a series of annual reports designed to provide State-level data from the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System. Child Maltreatment 2015 includes information on reports of abuse and neglect made to child protective services (CPS) agencies, the children involved, types of maltreatment, CPS responses, child and caregiver risk factors, services, and perpetrators.

Highlights of the 2015 report include the following:

The full report is available on the Children's Bureau website at https://www.acf.hhs.gov/cb/research-data-technology/statistics-research/child-maltreatment.
 

Issue Date: March 2017
Section: News From the Children's Bureau
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=184&articleid=4917


Addressing Teen Pregnancy Using an Implementation Infrastructure

The Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) is one of the largest federally funded programs designed to address teen pregnancy. It provides $75 million a year to States that meet the following four requirements of their implementation infrastructure: programs must be evidenced based, provide information on abstinence and contraception, incorporate adulthood preparation subjects, and focus on high-risk populations. A report produced by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation focuses on the outcomes of four States funded by PREP: California, Maine, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina.

Researchers conducted semistructured telephone interviews with each State's PREP support staff, State grantee administrative staff, training and technical assistance partners, evaluators, and program providers. Despite each State's unique characteristics with regard to funding, program plans, and size, researchers determined that the States took similar approaches to supporting and implementing their evidence-based programs with fidelity.

Each of the four States included the following activities:

The implications of these similarities are that the PREP implementation infrastructure may be replicated on a larger scale and across other programs or policy areas using key lessons learned from these four States, such as collaborating with expert partners and assessing how well the evidence-based programs fit the target population.

Supporting Statewide Implementation of Evidence-Based Teen Pregnancy Prevention Programs: Findings From Four PREP Grantees is available at http://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/opre/06991_d51_prep_dis_implementation_report_final_508.pdf (4,110 KB).
 

Issue Date: March 2017
Section: News From the Children's Bureau
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=184&articleid=4904


QIC-AG Project Videos: Child Welfare in the 21st Century

The National Quality Improvement Center for Adoption and Guardianship Support and Preservation (QIC-AG) released a new video that may be used in practice, classrooms, and administrative settings. The video highlights the challenges to achieving favorable outcomes and permanence for youth in foster care and improving child and family outcomes by implementing and evaluating interventions that promote permanence. In collaboration with eight partner sites, the QIC-AG is developing and evaluating evidence-based models of support and intervention to help achieve long-term and stable permanency.  

Viewers can choose between a brief video that provides an overview of the project or the full-length video that includes details about the QIC-AG's eight partner sites and their interventions.

The videos are available at http://qic-ag.org/videos/qic-ag-project-video/.
 

Issue Date: March 2017
Section: News From the Children's Bureau
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=184&articleid=4914


Funding Opportunity Announcement

In February 2017, the Administration on Children, Youth and Families released a new funding opportunity announcement (FOA).

Information about FOAs is available on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Grants Forecast website at https://www.grants.gov. To find the Children's Bureau's FOA forecasts, go to the forecast website and enter the title or Funding Opportunity Number (FON) in the search box. Please check the forecast site regularly, as forecasts are subject to change.
 

Issue Date: March 2017
Section: News From the Children's Bureau
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=184&articleid=4922


CB Website Updates

The Children's Bureau website hosts information on child welfare programs, funding, monitoring, training and technical assistance, laws, statistics, research, Federal reporting, and much more.

The following are recent additions to the site:

Visit the Children's Bureau website often to see what's new.
 

 

Issue Date: March 2017
Section: News From the Children's Bureau
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=184&articleid=4913


Child Welfare Research

Community Cafés in Alaska Discuss Strengthening Families Initiative

Between January and June 2016, the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services (DHSS) sponsored a series of community cafés in Anchorage, Hooper Bay, Kotzebue, Sitka, Sutton, and Wasilla. The cafés were attended by business leaders, educators, faith-community representatives, foster parents, grandparents, military personnel, parents, Tribal members, and youth, among others. One of the main goals of these gatherings was to facilitate a discussion about the Strengthening Families program and its five protective factors: parental resilience, social connections, knowledge of parenting and child development, concrete supports in times of need, and social and emotional competence of children. A new report from the Alaska DHSS presents the qualitative data collected at the cafés in order to inform and improve prevention and family support services in the State.

The community café discussions were conducted in small groups or used audience-response technology, which is a live polling technology using remote "clickers." Audience response allows participants to vote on an issue or topic anonymously and see results instantly displayed on a monitor. It also enables café facilitators to collect community feedback, analyze results, and rank the specific priorities of each Strengthening Families protective factor.

The findings and top priorities were similar across all community cafés and include the following:

In addition to a general summary, the report, Let's Talk About Safe Kids and Strong Families!, includes a section on each community that highlights the methods, participants, and findings particular to that area.

The full report is available at http://dhss.alaska.gov/ocs/Documents/Publications/pdf/CommunityCafeReport_2016.pdf (5,670 KB).

For more information about Strengthening Families, visit the website for the Center for the Study of Social Policy (CSSP) at http://www.cssp.org/. The CSSP website also offers information on community cafés, parent cafés, and world cafés at http://www.cssp.org/community/constituents-co-invested-in-change/community-and-parent-cafes. 
 

Issue Date: March 2017
Section: Child Welfare Research
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=184&articleid=4905


Study Examines Stability of Minnesota Child Protection Workforce

High turnover and job stress in the field of child protection is detrimental to the effectiveness of these programs and creates a gap in meeting the needs of families and children. For this reason, the Center for Advanced Studies in Child Welfare, in collaboration with the Minnesota Association of County Social Service Administrators Children's Committee and the Minnesota Department of Human Services, conducted an electronic survey in February 2016 to better understand the state of the child protection workforce in Minnesota.

The survey was sent to 1,948 frontline child welfare staff. Of these, 734 indicated they worked specifically in child protection, involuntary foster care, or adoption. The 734 respondents were predominantly female (87 percent) and Caucasian (93 percent) and were along the age spectrum of 20 to 25 to over 60 years old. The survey findings related to job satisfaction, the impact of secondary traumatic stress, and the adequacy of supervision and peer support.

The following is a sample of the survey's findings among the child protection respondents:

Furthermore, 79 percent of child protection workers plan to stay in their current jobs, whereas 21 percent plan to seek other employment within the next year, which may be a conservative estimate. In the next 12 months, it is expected that one in four child protection professionals will seek other employment. The respondents reported that higher salaries, lower caseloads, and fewer administrative requirements would help keep them from leaving their positions.

The Minnesota Child Welfare Workforce Stabilization Study 2016: Child Protection Summary Report is available at http://cascw.umn.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/WFSS_Summary.WEB_.pdf (286 KB).
 

Issue Date: March 2017
Section: Child Welfare Research
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=184&articleid=4906


Strategies and Tools for Practice

Enhancing Evidence-Building and Documentation Skills for Program Evaluation

The National Latin@ Network, in collaboration with Latino community organizations La Paz, Trans Latina Coalition, Mujeres Latinas en Acción, Voces Latinas, and Casa de Esperanza, launched a free, online, and bilingual resource called the Building Evidence Toolkit. This toolkit was designed to help those in Latino-serving organizations in the field of domestic violence strengthen their documentation and program evaluation skills.  

The Building Evidence Toolkit is divided into four sections.

The toolkit also contains an introductory webinar hosted by Josie Serrata, Ph.D., assistant director of research, that explains the importance of documenting evidence in a culturally sensitive manner when evaluating programs, as well as a tour of the online toolkit.

The Building Evidence Toolkit is available at http://nationallatinonetwork.org/be-toolkit-home.
 

Issue Date: March 2017
Section: Strategies and Tools for Practice
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=184&articleid=4908


New Workforce Development Toolkit

The Workforce Development Planning & Assessment Tool Kit, produced by the National Child Welfare Workforce Institute, is a companion resource to the Workforce Development Framework (WDF). The toolkit applies the principles of the WDF to an agency setting and offers a comprehensive approach to creating a workforce development roadmap by guiding agencies through the following three steps:

 The Workforce Development Planning & Assessment Tool Kit is available at http://wdftoolkit.ncwwi.org/index.html.
 

Issue Date: March 2017
Section: Strategies and Tools for Practice
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=184&articleid=4916


Resources

Top 10 Tips for Engaging Youth

The Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures produced a guide to help service providers and others engage with youth. Based on Achieve My Plan (AMP), which is an intervention focused on improving self-determination, treatment satisfaction, and community participation outcomes among emerging adults with serious mental health concerns, AMP's Top Ten Tips for Engaging With Young People includes tips on how to ask questions and maintain a conversation while completing a worksheet or curriculum with the youth by adding reflections, asking follow-up questions, and using good body language.

AMP's Top Ten Tips for Engaging With Young People is available at https://www.pathwaysrtc.pdx.edu/pdf/proj-5-AMP-top-ten-tips-for-engaging-young-people.pdf (208 KB).
 

Issue Date: March 2017
Section: Resources
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=184&articleid=4909


An Introduction to Financial Capability for Youth

The National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth developed a brief for youth about to enter the workforce regarding the importance of managing money. The brief aims to help youth be financially capable through five actions:

The brief also includes links to additional information from trustworthy sources, such as "Decoding Your Paycheck" from the U.S. Mint and "Paying Off Credit Cards" from MyCreditUnion.gov.

Taking Charge of Your Money: An Introduction to Financial Capability is available at http://www.ncwd-youth.info/sites/default/files/InfoBrief-43-Taking-Charge-of-Your-Money-An-Introduction-to-Financial-Capability.pdf (857 KB).
 

Issue Date: March 2017
Section: Resources
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=184&articleid=4910


Training and Conferences

Center for Juvenile Justice Reform Hosts 2017 LEAD Conference

The Center for Juvenile Justice Reform has finalized its list of speakers for the 2017 LEAD Conference on April 6–7, 2017, at Georgetown University in Washington, DC. The conference, "Moving From Research to Policy and Practice to Improve the Lives of Youth,"  will feature several of the nation’s leading child welfare experts, including researchers, policymakers, practitioners, and youth/family voices, to discuss the most pressing issues in the field, such as promoting permanency and self-sufficiency for system-involved youth.

Issue Date: March 2017
Section: Training and Conferences
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=184&articleid=4918


Webinar Focuses on Racial Equity in the Child Welfare Workforce

The National Child Welfare Workforce Institute's "Mind the Gap" webinar series focuses on strategies for workforce development in child welfare. "Mind the Gap #9: Achieving Racial Equity Through Workforce & Organizational Change" highlights the Center for the Study of Social Policy (CSSP) and its work to advance racial equality, equity, and justice in every level of the child welfare workforce, from conducting organizational assessments to training child welfare professionals.

To achieve better outcomes for young people of color in foster care, CSSP is working to implement an antiracist approach to training child welfare organizations and agencies to ensure they work to achieve racial equity within their organizations and implement systems that reduce disproportionality and disparity for children, youth, and families. 

CSSP suggests specific pathways to becoming an antiracist organization:

The webinar also includes a follow-up "learning exchange" based on methods and findings from the staff of Ramsey County Community Human Service Department in Minnesota. Ramsey County created the Ramsey County Antiracism Leadership Team in 2005 to direct the department's efforts to become a multicultural and antiracist organization and eliminate cultural and racial disparities within its service offerings. 

"Mind the Gap #9: Achieving Racial Equity Through Workforce & Organizational Change" and its accompanying "learning exchange" are available at http://ncwwi.org/index.php/link/275-mind-the-gap-9-achieving-racial-equity-through-workforce-organizational-change.
 

Issue Date: March 2017
Section: Training and Conferences
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=184&articleid=4915


Conferences

Upcoming national conferences on child welfare and adoption through April 2017 include:

March 2017

April 2017


 

 

Issue Date: March 2017
Section: Training and Conferences
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=184&articleid=4912



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