Children's Bureau ExpressJune 2018 | Vol. 19, No. 5

Table of Contents
 

Spotlight on Engaging Fathers
In this month's CBX, read a message from Jerry Milner, Associate Commissioner of the Children's Bureau, about the value of father involvement to the healthy development of children and to family connectedness, particularly for children and youth involved in child welfare; how responsible fatherhood programs can help low-income fathers overcome barriers keeping them from being involved in their children's lives; how proper training can help child welfare professionals better engage fathers and help them succeed, and more.

  • A Time to Celebrate and to Challenge Ourselves
  • Responsible Fatherhood Programs Address Complex Needs of Low-Income Men
  • Dads Rock: Nurturing Father Engagement
  • Attachment Behaviors in Children With Incarcerated Fathers
  • Advanced Fatherhood Training Curriculum Package

News From the Children's Bureau
Read about how at-risk youth are turning to runaway hotlines to seek help before leaving home, how substance use in families affects child welfare caseloads, a listing of the latest updates to the Children's Bureau website, and more.

  • Report Shows Youth Increasingly Turning to Federal Help Hotline Before Running Away
  • The Relationship Between Substance Use Indicators and Child Welfare Caseloads
  • Strengthening Protections for Social Security Beneficiaries Act of 2018
  • CB Website Updates

Child Welfare Research
We highlight the impact of early-life, trauma-informed care on repairing developmental disruptions in infants who have been abused or neglected as well as a recent survey that measures the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences in children in the United States.

  • Study Assesses Trauma-Impacted Development in Early Life, Potential Corrective Interventions
  • Health Survey Finds Most Common Adverse Childhood Experiences Are Economic Hardship, Parental Breakups

Strategies and Tools for Practice
This section of CBX offers publications, articles, reports, toolkits, and other resources that provide either evidence-based strategies or other concrete help to child welfare and related professionals.

  • Webinar Looks at Legal Considerations of Opioids, Marijuana, and Child Protection
  • Trauma-Informed Approaches for Programs Working With Fathers
  • Six Tasks That Will Help Your Agency Explore Challenges and Plan for Change

Resources
This section of CBX provides a quick list of interesting resources, such as websites, videos, journals, funding or scholarship opportunities, or other materials that can be used in the field or with families.

  • Driver's Manual for New Dads
  • Tip Sheet for Dads Highlights the Benefits of Reading to Children

Training and Conferences

  • Online Training for Child Welfare, Substance Use Treatment, and Legal Professionals
  • Conferences

Spotlight on Engaging Fathers

A Time to Celebrate and to Challenge Ourselves

Written by Jerry Milner, Associate Commissioner at the Children's Bureau.

The month of June provides two causes for celebration in the child welfare world, Father's Day and National Reunification Month. Both allow us the opportunity to reflect on the importance of families. Both also prompt us to redouble our efforts to strengthen families and do everything we can as a system and in our communities to respect and nurture the integrity of the parent-child relationship.

The value of father involvement to the healthy development of children and to family connectedness is critical. Even when fathers are unable to be active in their children's lives, paternal relatives remain vital sources of support and belonging, and they can make a tremendous difference in the healthy development and everyday lives of children. 

Even so, working with fathers has long been a challenge in child welfare. Unfortunately, the latest round of the Child and Family Services Reviews confirms that the challenge continues.  Father engagement can be difficult and discouraging work. Human relationships, trauma, geographic separation, and a host of other societal conditions often exacerbate the challenge, not to mention values that may lead to ignoring or devaluing fathers who do not reside with their children. I know that there are incredible efforts out there that are making headway on engaging fathers, but I am afraid they remain the exception rather than the norm. 

I am afraid, as professionals, we may be too soon to rule out or fail to recognize the inherent value of fathers to the lives of children, even if they do not reside under the same roof. In fact, the fears that fathers and their families may have relative to other human service programs—for example, child support and public assistance—may discourage fathers from coming forward seeking more active engagement with their children. We in Administration for Children and Families (ACF) are actively addressing these concerns across ACF programs so that we can project consistently positive messages and expectations regarding father involvement and alleviate some of the real or imagined barriers to keeping fathers closely connected to their children.

Similarly, Reunification Month is a time to celebrate resiliency, hard work, and the power of families to heal. It is a time to acknowledge perseverance and commit to seeking positive outcomes for families separated through foster care. Parents that achieve reunification often have overcome great odds—and too often without adequate support. Their achievement is a demonstration of parental love and its ability to propel change. 

Reunification month also is a time to challenge ourselves to reduce the unnecessary removal of children from their homes and a reminder of the critical importance and benefit of investing in families before harm occurs and before separation becomes necessary. The road for too many parents is incredibly arduous. We fall short of providing parents with services that match their specific needs in ways that are easy to access and effective. We ask parents to do an awful lot—sometimes too much—given all they may be confronting and the real possibly that they may be struggling with their own personal trauma histories. Responding to these situations requires us to reflect on our values as a profession, system, and society and seek to create the kinds of community-based environments where families can receive the supports they need and be helped to avoid damaging crises.

This June, we have an opportunity to imagine a child welfare system where fathers are supported and engaged as a rule and where foster care and reunification are needed less because families are strong and intact. Let's demonstrate our commitment to fathers and all parents by working together to build a system that supports the conditions for all families to thrive, a system that is proactive, preventative, and allows all families to maximize their greatest potential.
 

Issue Date: June 2018
Section: Spotlight on Engaging Fathers
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=197&articleid=5160


Responsible Fatherhood Programs Address Complex Needs of Low-Income Men

Children who grow up without fathers are more likely to experience poor outcomes in areas such as social-emotional adjustment, education, and mental health. These negative effects have been shown to be diminished by increasing father involvement and improving the quality of father-child interactions. A recent report developed for the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, an office of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, examined the characteristics and opinions of fathers enrolled in four responsible fatherhood programs included in the Parents and Children Together evaluation. The report addressed the following questions:

A total of 5,522 fathers enrolled in one of the four fatherhood programs between 2012 and 2015 took part in a survey upon enrollment. The evaluators then conducted three rounds of annual in-person interviews with a subset of fathers from each fatherhood program. Evaluators collected additional data from  program staff during two rounds of site visits, father focus-group findings, and programs' reports on fathers' involvement and participation.

Key study findings include the following:

The report also offers the following recommendations on how to improve fatherhood programs:

The report, Parents and Children Together: The Complex Needs of Low-Income Men and How Responsible Fatherhood Programs Address Them, is available at https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/opre/pact_fatherhood_programs_022618_b508.pdf (3,940 KB)
 

Issue Date: June 2018
Section: Spotlight on Engaging Fathers
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=197&articleid=5131


Dads Rock: Nurturing Father Engagement

The Child Abuse and Neglect Technical Assistance and Strategic Dissemination Center, which is funded by the Children's Bureau's Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, has released a video, "Dads Rock: Nurturing Father Engagement," that follows fathers as they work to become more engaged with their children and the professionals working to help them achieve their fatherhood goals. The video highlights the work of the Children's Trust of Massachusetts Fatherhood Initiative and looks at home visiting with dads, father support groups, and professional men's family service providers' groups to provide insights into how to work with fathers' particular needs and address existing biases.

"Dads Rock: Nurturing Father Engagement" is available at https://cantasd.acf.hhs.gov/bcbh/dads-rock/.
 

Issue Date: June 2018
Section: Spotlight on Engaging Fathers
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=197&articleid=5161


Attachment Behaviors in Children With Incarcerated Fathers

A recent episode of the Poverty Research and Policy Podcast series, hosted by the Institute for Research on Poverty of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, focuses on attachment behaviors in children with incarcerated fathers. The episode, "Attachment Behaviors in Children with Incarcerated Fathers," features Julie Poehlmann-Tynan, professor of human ecology at the University of Wisconsin and author of the blog Kids With Incarcerated Parents.

The podcast features a study published by Dr. Poehlmann-Tynan and colleagues that describes children's relationships with their caregivers, which are usually the parents or family members left at home while a parent is incarcerated. The researchers went to the children's homes and spoke with the caregivers and assessed the home environment. They also observed the children's visits with their incarcerated fathers and applied their findings to the jail-prison observation checklist, which was developed by Dr. Poehlemann-Tynan to capture children's attachment behaviors and emotions during visits.

Dr. Poehlmann-Tynan found that children showed heightened attachment behaviors with their caregivers during visits to the jail or prison (e.g., often wanting to hold hands or sit on the caregiver's lap). She also found that during these visits, many of the caregivers exhibited positive behaviors that facilitated children's connections with their incarcerated parents. Caregivers would say things such as, "Show daddy what you just learned how to read,"  "Show daddy what song you just learned," or "Why don't you blow daddy a kiss?" However, there also were visits where the caregiver and the incarcerated parent argued in front of the child or the caregiver had no interest at all in the visit, which led to a more negative atmosphere.

The type of visit—face-to-face contact or noncontact—also affected the child's behavior. Face-to-face contact visits often occurred in prisons, while noncontact visits, with the child on one side of a Plexiglas barrier and the incarcerated parent on the other side, were the most common for jails. Children were most likely to display negative behaviors, such as showing signs of distress or anger directed at the caregiver who brought them, during noncontact visits. Regardless of the visit type, most children reacted with happiness when they saw their parent, which emphasizes the importance of maintaining a visiting schedule that helps keep the child connected to their incarcerated parent.

Dr. Peohlmann-Tynann also discusses how to help families stay connected to incarcerated individuals, especially when there are young children involved and how caregivers' attitudes play a major role in facilitating jail or prison visits and making them a positive experience for the children of incarcerated parents. In addition to addressing visits, Dr. Peohlmann-Tynann noted that law enforcement should consider how they interact with the children of the individuals they arrest, as witnessing the arrest of a parent can have lasting negative effects. She suggests additional training for law enforcement on how to handle these sensitive situations.

A transcript of the podcast is available at https://www.irp.wisc.edu/publications/media/podcasts/PC57-2017-August-Transcript.pdf (145 KB).
 

Issue Date: June 2018
Section: Spotlight on Engaging Fathers
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=197&articleid=5133


Advanced Fatherhood Training Curriculum Package

The National Family Preservation Network offers the Advanced Fatherhood Training Curriculum, a follow-up curriculum to the Basic Fatherhood Training Curriculum. This training is intended for professionals who want to better engage fathers who are resistant or reluctant to getting involved with their children. This curriculum focuses on the skills needed to engage fathers as well as best practices in working with them.

The training package contains a 33-page manual featuring the following topics:

The training also includes a 33-minute video on best practices featuring the following:

This training is recommended to be conducted in small groups to allow enough time for reflection and discussion. The materials also include a recommended format for the training.

Advanced Fatherhood Training Curriculum is available at http://www.nfpn.org/father-involvement/advanced-training-pack.

Related Item

Children's Bureau Express has previously covered the National Family Preservation Network's fatherhood curricula in the article "Father Involvement Curricula" (April 2012, Vol. 13, No. 3), which includes information on and where to find Basic Fatherhood Training Curriculum. The article is available at https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewHomepage&issueID=134.
 

Issue Date: June 2018
Section: Spotlight on Engaging Fathers
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=197&articleid=5142


News From the Children's Bureau

Report Shows Youth Increasingly Turning to Federal Help Hotline Before Running Away

New data from the National Communication System, a federally funded hotline operated by the National Runaway Safeline (NRS), shows that an increasing number of young people are calling for help before they follow through on possible plans to run away. These data are presented in the 2016 National Runaway Safeline Crisis Contacts Report, which was released by the Family and Youth Services Bureau within the Administration for Children and Families of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

NRS responded to 29,806 calls or messages in 2016, about 74 percent of which were from youth age 21 or younger either seeking help for themselves or a friend. Data show that 9 percent of the calls were from parents and 6 percent were from concerned friends of the youth. The report shows that more youth are seeking help before they run away or end up homeless, as 35 percent of contacts were from youth contemplating running away and 16 percent were from youth who had already run away from home. The report notes that, by comparison, 56 percent of the reported hotline calls in 2011 were about youth already living on the street, 37 percent were from youth who had run away, and only 13 percent were from youth thinking about running away. Almost three-quarters (71 percent) of the NRS contacts in 2016 were from girls, and 27 percent were from boys. Nearly half (44 percent) of contacts were White, 18 percent were Black, and 16 percent were Hispanic or Latino. In decreasing order of importance, contacts were for the following reasons:

The 2016 National Runaway Safeline Crisis Contacts Report is available at https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/fysb/nrs_crisis_contacts_report_1.pdf (1,700 KB).
 

Issue Date: June 2018
Section: News From the Children's Bureau
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=197&articleid=5143


The Relationship Between Substance Use Indicators and Child Welfare Caseloads

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation released a research brief presenting the results from a statistical analysis that outlines the relationship between substance use and child welfare caseloads.

Researchers conducted 188 interviews in 11 communities across the United States to try to understand the experiences of child welfare administrators and practitioners, substance use treatment administrators and practitioners, judges and other legal professionals, law enforcement officials, and other service providers with regard to their community's response to substance use among parents involved in child welfare. They looked at select indicators of substance use, such as overdose rates and rates of drug-related hospital stays and emergency department visits. In addition, the research team looked at the changes in foster care rates these local professionals were seeing in their service populations, their methods for substance use assessment and treatment, collaborative activities among key stakeholders in addressing families' complex needs, areas of success, and barriers to success.

The brief presents the following findings:

This research brief, The Relationship Between Substance Use Indicators and Child Welfare Caseloads, is available at http://www.aspe.hhs.gov/system/files/pdf/258831/SubstanceUseCWCaseloads.pdf (390 KB).
 

Issue Date: June 2018
Section: News From the Children's Bureau
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=197&articleid=5145


Strengthening Protections for Social Security Beneficiaries Act of 2018

On April 13, 2018, the Strengthening Protections for Social Security Beneficiaries Act of 2018 (P.L. 115–165) was signed in to law. The act amends information-sharing and overpayment liability requirements of child welfare agencies under the Supplemental Security Income program and the Old Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance program. P.L. 115–165 requires the Social Security Administration (SSA) to establish a monthly data exchange between SSA and state foster care agencies to identify beneficiaries with payees whose foster care arrangements have changed (i.e., the child entered foster care, exited foster care, or changed foster care placement in a given month) so SSA can redetermine the payee. It also clarifies that state payees for minors in foster care are responsible for repaying overpayments incurred while the state acted as payee. This provision is effective for determinations made on or after April 13, 2018, and for amounts unrecovered as of enactment. For purposes of this clarification on liability for overpayment, "minor" refers to a child as defined for purposes of section 475(8) of the Social Security Act.  

For additional information and questions about P.L. 115–165, please refer to the SSA Legislative Bulletin. Title IV-E agencies building a Comprehensive Child Welfare Information System (CCWIS) may be able to add this data exchange as an optional interface. Contact your Children's Bureau federal systems analyst (https://www.acf.hhs.gov/cb/resource/state-tribe-assignments) for more information on CCWIS.
 

Issue Date: June 2018
Section: News From the Children's Bureau
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=197&articleid=5159


CB Website Updates

The Children's Bureau website hosts information on child welfare programs, funding, monitoring, training and technical assistance, laws, statistics, research, federal reporting, and much more.

Recent additions to the site include the following:

Visit the Children's Bureau website often to see what's new.

Issue Date: June 2018
Section: News From the Children's Bureau
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=197&articleid=5154


Child Welfare Research

Study Assesses Trauma-Impacted Development in Early Life, Potential Corrective Interventions

Children age 2 and under are particularly vulnerable to child abuse and neglect and account for over one-fourth of all substantiated cases of child maltreatment. However, child welfare workers are faced with a shortage of interventions for mitigating trauma in this sensitive population. A new study emphasizes that social workers are uniquely poised to spot trauma and intervene on a family's behalf with developmentally sensitive and trauma-informed treatments for infants and toddlers.

Untreated trauma from early childhood abuse and neglect has the potential to disrupt a child's cognitive, behavioral, social-emotional, physical health, mental health, and well-being over a lifetime. Children who suffer early maltreatment are most at risk for attachment-related disorders and impaired brain development. Because of this, therapeutic interventions are most successful when they strengthen the caregiver-child relationship and repair disrupted attachment.

The study provides an overview of two evidence-based interventions that address infant and toddler exposure to trauma: Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP) and Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up (ABC). CPP is for children from birth through age 5 who have experienced disruptions with their primary caregivers due to early traumatic experiences. CPP seeks to restore attachment patterns and developmental trajectories through clinician-monitored free play between the parent (or primary caregiver) and child, which allows observers to note their spontaneous interactions with each other. It focuses on both the child and parent, including any potential trauma and insecure attachments in the parent's or primary caregiver's past. Research has found that CPP results in enhanced maternal empathy and parent-child interactions as well as decreased infant avoidance, resistance, and anger issues.

ABC is a 10-session relational model aimed at addressing the physiological and behavioral impacts of early childhood trauma through play. During the sessions, the clinician focuses on common trauma responses in attachment relationships, such as the child pushing the parent away; the parent's own experiences that may interfere with attachment, such as past or current stressors; and the child's adaptive physiological and behavioral responses. The clinician guides the parent to follow the child's lead and respond to his or her cues and uses videotaped interactions to help parents or primary caregivers understand their automatic responses. Research has shown that ABC interventions result in reduced stress hormone levels and behavioral problems.

The report also lists considerations for treatment, such as taking into account the past experiences of caregivers as well as any current stressors they may be going through and whether the intervention is able to increase mutual sensitivity between children and their caregivers.

"Trauma-Exposed Infants and Toddlers: A Review of Impacts and Evidence-Based Interventions," by Alysse Melville (Advances in Social Work, 18), is available at https://journals.iupui.edu/index.php/advancesinsocialwork/article/view/21287/20835 (PDF - 491 KB).
 

Issue Date: June 2018
Section: Child Welfare Research
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=197&articleid=5146


Health Survey Finds Most Common Adverse Childhood Experiences Are Economic Hardship, Parental Breakups

Economic hardship and the divorce or separation of parents are the two most common adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) of children in the United States, according to a new brief from ChildTrends. The brief is based on data from the 2016 National Survey of Children's Health (NSCH) and describes the prevalence of eight specific ACEs among children from birth through age 17, as reported by a parent or guardian.

ACEs can cause intense feelings of fear and helplessness in children and have been linked to negative outcomes across the lifespan, including poor physical and mental health, substance use, depression, lower educational attainment, unemployment, and poverty. Not all children who experience ACEs suffer lasting consequences, as the long-term outcomes are often offset or mitigated if they occurred within the context of positive relationships.

The NSCH survey asks parents or guardians whether their children have ever experienced the following:

Key findings include the following:

The Prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences, Nationally, by State, and by Race or Ethnicity is available at https://www.childtrends.org/publications/prevalence-adverse-childhood-experiences-nationally-state-race-ethnicity/.
 

Issue Date: June 2018
Section: Child Welfare Research
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=197&articleid=5147


Strategies and Tools for Practice

Webinar Looks at Legal Considerations of Opioids, Marijuana, and Child Protection

An increase in the use of both illicit and prescription opioids by pregnant women has led to a rise in children born with neonatal abstinence syndrome and other related health issues. Additionally, several states have legalized marijuana to some degree. These circumstances create a unique set of challenges, and it is important for child welfare workers to be familiar with what they may encounter in child maltreatment cases. The California Evidence-Based Clearinghouse for Child Welfare hosted a webinar that reviewed the legal framework for the child protection system, including looking at statutes and summarizing appellate case law, and offered suggestions for addressing associated problems that may arise.

The hour-long webinar will help child welfare workers with the following:

The webinar, "Opioids, Marijuana, and Child Protection: Legal Considerations of Recent Developments," and accompanying PowerPoint are available at http://www.cebc4cw.org/cebc-webinars?cebc-sponsored-webinars/.

 

Issue Date: June 2018
Section: Strategies and Tools for Practice
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=197&articleid=5148


Trauma-Informed Approaches for Programs Working With Fathers

A factsheet from the National Responsible Fatherhood Clearinghouse (NRFC), which is funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Family Assistance, highlights the importance of a trauma-informed approach when engaging fathers and provides background information, tips, and related resources. Many fathers participating in fatherhood programs may have experienced trauma, and the NRFC advises that all programs be trauma informed by following a process of "universal precaution," which assumes all clients may have experienced trauma.

The NRFC factsheet recommends that programs and individuals who work with fathers adopt the following approach:

Additionally, the factsheet points out the following:

Trauma-Informed Approaches and Awareness for Programs Working With Fathers is available at https://www.fatherhood.gov/content/nrfc-tips-professionals.

 

Issue Date: June 2018
Section: Strategies and Tools for Practice
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=197&articleid=5149


Six Tasks That Will Help Your Agency Explore Challenges and Plan for Change

Written by the Children's Bureau's Capacity Building Center for States. 

Our article in the May issue of Children's Bureau Express discussed deeper problem exploration as a tool to plan for change and implement lasting solutions. Deeper problem exploration involves identifying a problem and systematically exploring data to verify the problem, describe under what circumstances it occurs, and identify those affected. How do you begin this process? Six basic tasks, sometimes called essential functions, can help agencies effectively initiate change.


These six tasks give agencies a systematic way to understand the problem and why it is occurring so that they can implement effective solutions.

The following resources provide more information on deeper problem exploration:

  1. "5 Whys: Getting to the Root of a Problem Quickly"
  2. "Determine the Root Cause: 5 Whys"
  3. "Root Cause Analysis for Beginners"
  4. "Root Cause Analysis: Keep the Questions Coming"
  5. "Focused CQI Services, Indepth Skill Building – Module 5: Data Analysis for CQI – Identifying and Understanding the Problem" (requires free registration)

Issue Date: June 2018
Section: Strategies and Tools for Practice
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=197&articleid=5157


Resources

Driver's Manual for New Dads

Children who have engaged fathers are more likely to have positive outcomes than children and youth who do not. These children have greater academic success, more positive social behavior, reduced contact with the juvenile justice system, and more. A Driver's Manual for New Dads: A Resource Guide for Taking Care of Your Partner and Your New Baby was released by the New York State Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance and covers many aspects and potential questions a new father may have, including the following:

This easy-to-read guide gives fathers valuable tips and suggestions that they can use in their day-to-day lives with their children. It is available at https://otda.ny.gov/programs/publications/4901.pdf (980 KB).
 

Issue Date: June 2018
Section: Resources
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=197&articleid=5150


Tip Sheet for Dads Highlights the Benefits of Reading to Children

The National Responsible Fatherhood Clearinghouse, which is funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Family Assistance, recently published a tip sheet for fathers on the benefits of reading to their children. It emphasizes the importance of reading, the impact it has on child development (e.g., doing better in school), and reading as an opportunity to bond with their child. The tips are actionable and straightforward. They stress how to read to your child and focusing on the quality of the time spent with the child over the quantity.

The tips include the following:

It also includes a lists of resources for dads, such as websites with suggestions for children's books and tools and programs to help children learn to read.

The tip sheet, NRFC Tips for Dads: The Benefits of Reading to Your Children, is available at https://www.fatherhood.gov/content/nrfc-tips-dads.
 

Issue Date: June 2018
Section: Resources
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=197&articleid=5152


Training and Conferences

Online Training for Child Welfare, Substance Use Treatment, and Legal Professionals

Collaboration between the child welfare system, substance use treatment facilities, and the courts is important to helping families who are involved with child welfare and have substance use problems achieve better outcomes. The National Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare has released free online tutorials to support and facilitate this partnership. These tutorials, which should be taken in order, are divided into the following three parts, each consisting of five modules:

Additionally, the training includes the toolkit, Helping Child Welfare Workers Support Families With Substance Use, Mental, and Co-Occurring Disorders Training Package, which was developed to educate child welfare professionals about substance use and mental health disorders they could encounter when working with families. It consists of six modules that contain a training plan and script, PowerPoint presentations, case vignettes, handouts, and reading materials.

The tutorials and training toolkit are available at https://ncsacw.samhsa.gov/training/default.aspx.
 

Issue Date: June 2018
Section: Training and Conferences
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=197&articleid=5153


Conferences

Upcoming conferences and events on child welfare and adoption include the following:

June

July

August

Issue Date: June 2018
Section: Training and Conferences
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=197&articleid=5155



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Children's Bureau Express does not disclose, give, sell, or transfer any personal information, including email addresses, unless required for law enforcement by statute.


Contact us at cb_express@childwelfare.gov.

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