Children's Bureau Express10 2003 | Vol. 4, No. 8

Table of Contents
 

News From the Children's Bureau

  • National Adoption Month 2003 Campaign Recruitment & Marketing Kit Now Available
  • New Bill Aims to Increase Adoptions of Older Children in Foster Care
  • National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information Launches New Website Design

Child Welfare Research

  • Collaboration with Law Enforcement Found to Enhance Abuse Investigations
  • Predictors of Recurrence in Child Protective Cases Involving Substance Abuse
  • State Department Issues Proposed Regulations for Intercountry Adoptions
  • U.S. Census Counts Adopted Children for the First Time
  • New Resources on the Domestic Violence-Child Maltreatment Connection

Strategies and Tools for Practice

  • CASASTART Program Helps Deter Drug Use and Violent Behavior in At-Risk Youth
  • New Resource for Preventing Youth Homelessness

Resources

  • Strengths, Challenges, and Needs of Kinship Caregivers
  • Recruiting Students Into the Child Welfare Field
  • 2004 Public Human Services Directory
  • "Next Generation Grants" Available
  • Online Funding Tools

Training and Conferences

  • New Training Curriculum Helps Involve Fathers in Their Children's Lives
  • Conferences

News From the Children's Bureau

National Adoption Month 2003 Campaign Recruitment & Marketing Kit Now Available

The Collaboration to AdoptUSKids, in partnership with the National Resource Center for Special Needs Adoption and the Children's Bureau, created the National Adoption Month 2003 Campaign Recruitment & Marketing Kit to help increase awareness about adoption and support efforts to recruit and retain foster and adoptive parents. In the kit, local organizations will find tools and resources to help them plan and implement activities for National Adoption Month in November.

Contents include:

The National Resource Center for Special Needs Adoption (www.nrcadoption.org) assists States, Tribes, and other federally funded child welfare agencies in building their capacity to ensure the safety, well being, and permanency of abused and neglected children through adoption and post-legal adoption services program planning, policy development, and practice. Contact the Resource Center at (248) 443-0306 or nrc@nrcadoption.org for information about ordering kits and additional supplies for National Adoption Month.

The Children's Bureau's Collaboration to AdoptUSKids (www.adoptuskids.org) is a project to devise and implement a national adoptive family recruitment and retention strategy, operate the AdoptUSKids.org website, encourage and enhance adoptive family support organizations, and conduct a variety of adoption research projects. The Collaboration can be reached at (888) 200-4005 or info@adoptuskids.org.

Issue Date: 10 2003
Section: News From the Children's Bureau
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=46&articleid=726


New Bill Aims to Increase Adoptions of Older Children in Foster Care

A bill introduced in the House of Representatives would reauthorize the Adoption Incentives Program and better target incentives to meet the needs of older children in foster care waiting for families. The Adoption Promotion Act of 2003 (H.R. 3182) was introduced on September 25, 2003, and was referred to the House Ways and Means Committee for further consideration.

While the overall number of children being adopted from foster care has grown dramatically in recent years, older children still face long waits and, in many cases, are never adopted. Children in this older age group now represent almost half of the children waiting to be adopted nationally. To address this problem, the Adoption Promotion Act would link some incentive dollars directly to increases in adoptions of children ages 9 and older, while continuing to recognize and reward overall increases in the number of adoptions.

Wade F. Horn, Ph.D., Assistant Secretary for Children and Families, presented the Administration's proposal for similar changes before the Human Resources Subcommittee of the House Ways and Means Committee in April. In his testimony, Dr. Horn praised the Adoption Incentives Program, saying, "By providing a fiscal incentive and by shining a bright light on State performance in adoption, [the Adoption Incentives Program] has made a substantial contribution to increasing the number of children adopted over the past 5 years."

Another bill to reauthorize the Adoption Incentives Program (S. 1439) was introduced in the Senate in July and was referred to the Senate Finance Committee. For full text and information about the status of either bill visit THOMAS, a legislative tracking service of the Library of Congress, at http://thomas.loc.gov.

Related Items

Approximately $14.9 million in bonuses was paid to 25 States and Puerto Rico for increasing the number of children adopted from State-supervised foster care in fiscal year 2002. For more information, including a list of States and amounts received, see the press release on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services website at www.hhs.gov/news/press/2003pres/20030912.html.

For more on the Administration's efforts in support of adoption, see "Better Futures for Waiting Children" by Dr. Wade Horn, in the December 2002/January 2003 issue of Children's Bureau Express.

For information about National Adoption Month 2003 (November), see "National Adoption Month 2003 Campaign Recruitment & Marketing Kit Now Available" in this issue.

Issue Date: 10 2003
Section: News From the Children's Bureau
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=46&articleid=729


National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information Launches New Website Design

The National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information is pleased to announce the launch of its redesigned website (http://nccanch.acf.hhs.gov). By enhancing the Clearinghouse's ability to connect users with timely, reliable information about child abuse and neglect, child abuse and neglect prevention, and child welfare, the site truly embodies the new Clearinghouse tagline, "Gateways to Information: Protecting Children, Strengthening Families."

"More than 99 percent of our contacts with customers now take place via the Web," said Mary Sullivan, Clearinghouse Director. "We believe the design of this new site, developed with extensive user input, will help us serve those customers more efficiently by directing them quickly and easily to the information they need."

To create the website's new design, the Clearinghouse went directly to its two largest customer groups: child welfare professionals and the general public. Clearinghouse staff asked selected users to review the current site and provide feedback on whether--and how easily--they found what they needed most. This detailed "usability testing" was part of a larger needs assessment process that included focus groups and interviews with key stakeholders such as State child welfare program managers, directors of National Resource Centers, representatives from other national organizations, and Federal employees.

Ongoing responsiveness to user concerns is built in to the new site's design, through a "Give Us Suggestions" feature, an opportunity to rate and comment on the utility of various resources, and a section of the home page that will highlight the site's most popular resources. Other notable features include:

Clearinghouse staff are still available to assist customers by mail, phone, fax, or email. The contact information remains the same:

National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information
330 C Street, SW
Washington, DC 20447
Phone: (800) 394-3366 or (703) 385-7565
Fax: (703) 385-3206
Email: nccanch@caliber.com

Issue Date: 10 2003
Section: News From the Children's Bureau
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=46&articleid=715


Child Welfare Research

Collaboration with Law Enforcement Found to Enhance Abuse Investigations

A collaborative effort between law enforcement and child protective services (CPS) is the preferred approach to investigating reports of child maltreatment, according to a recent study issued by the American Humane Association. Investigation Models for Child Abuse and Neglect--Collaboration with Law Enforcement is the second and final report in an effort to delineate the different models of collaboration between law enforcement and CPS being utilized in the United States, analyze how those models are implemented in practice, and determine how well they are working.

The analysis, completed with support from the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation and its Center for Community Partnerships in Child Welfare, explores how collaborative programs are being implemented at sites in six States: Wyoming, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Texas, Utah, and Florida. Each site was selected to represent one of the following three models of CPS-law enforcement cooperation:

  1. Minimal law enforcement involvement or coordination (Wyoming)
  2. Joint or coordinated child abuse and neglect investigations (Pennsylvania, Delaware, Texas, and Utah)
  3. Sole law enforcement investigation responsibility (Florida)

For each site, the report offers a description of the model, demographics of the setting, how the model works in policy and practice, strengths of the model, suggestions to better serve children and families, and outcomes data. The report also includes results of interviews with representatives from eight national organizations, to provide an overview of national collaboration trends. A 14-page executive summary collects overarching themes from the site visits, best practices, and practice concerns.

Investigation Models for Child Abuse and Neglect--Collaboration with Law Enforcement is available on the American Humane website at http://www.americanhumane.org/site/DocServer/PC-EMC_Report_6_03.pdf? docID=1141.

Issue Date: 10 2003
Section: Child Welfare Research
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=46&articleid=718


Predictors of Recurrence in Child Protective Cases Involving Substance Abuse

A recent study published in the July 2003 issue of Children and Youth Services Review found four factors were associated with an increased risk of maltreatment recurrence within 60 days among families with substance abuse problems:

The study involved 95 cases, randomly selected from the Illinois Child Abuse and Neglect Tracking System database, in which alcohol or drugs were related to the maltreatment report. All cases involved first-time child protective services (CPS) reports. More than one-quarter of the families in this study had a second maltreatment report within the 60-day timeframe.

Researchers cite a number of practice implications based on these findings, including:

A copy of this article can be obtained from the primary author:

Tamara Fuller
Children and Family Research Center
1203 W. Oregon
Urbana, IL 61801
t-fuller@uiuc.edu

Related Items

For more about addressing substance abuse in child welfare cases, see these articles in previous issues of Children's Bureau Express:

Issue Date: 10 2003
Section: Child Welfare Research
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=46&articleid=719


State Department Issues Proposed Regulations for Intercountry Adoptions

The U.S. Department of State issued long-awaited proposed regulations (www.childwelfarelaw.info/HagueAdoptionRegs.pdf; Editor's note: this link is no longer available) in mid-September to implement the Intercountry Adoption Act. Signed into law in 2000, the Act ( http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=106_cong_public_laws&docid=f:publ279.106.pdf) implements the Hague Convention, a global treaty that should provide greater safety, accountability, and transparency for the tens of thousands of adoptive families who seek to adopt children from other nations each year. Comments are being accepted until November 14, 2003.

The proposed regulations were created to ensure:

Commenters may send hard copy submissions or comments in electronic format. For complete submission instructions, see the Federal Register announcement at www.childwelfarelaw.info/HagueAdoptionRegs.pdf (Editor's note: this link is no longer available).

For further information contact Edward Betancourt or Anna Mary Coburn at (202) 647-2826, or Jessica Rosenbaum at (202) 312-9717. Hearing- or speech-impaired persons may use Telecommunications Devices for the Deaf (TDD) by contacting the Federal Information Relay Service at (800) 877-8339.

Related Items

Read more about the Hague Convention in previous issues of Children's Bureau Express:

Issue Date: 10 2003
Section: Child Welfare Research
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=46&articleid=728


U.S. Census Counts Adopted Children for the First Time

The Census Bureau took its first-ever look at adopted children in a report released in August. Adopted Children and Stepchildren (www.census.gov/prod/2003pubs/censr-6.pdf) presents information on the characteristics of 2.1 million adopted children and 4.4 million stepchildren, as estimated from the Census 2000 sample that collected data from approximately 1 out of every 6 households.

Some highlights of findings include:

Census 2000 represents the largest, most complete data source on characteristics of adopted children, their families, and households. However, because children were identified only by how they are related to the householder, this report cannot provide a comprehensive count of all adopted children. For example, if a married couple lived in a household of one of their parents, their children would be reported as "grandchildren of the householder" whether or not they were adopted.

Related Item

For information about the Federal Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System (AFCARS), which tracks U.S. adoptions from foster care, read "Efforts to Improve State Reporting on Foster Care and Adoption Are Paying Off" in the May/June 2001 issue of Children's Bureau Express (http://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov). The most recent AFCARS report (#8) can be found on the Children's Bureau website at www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/publications/afcars/report8.htm.

Issue Date: 10 2003
Section: Child Welfare Research
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=46&articleid=717


New Resources on the Domestic Violence-Child Maltreatment Connection

Research indicates 30 to 60 percent of families involved with the child welfare system also experience domestic violence. In order to serve these children and families effectively, child welfare workers need to be aware of the issue and know how to help.

The National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS) website recently added a new "In the Spotlight" area addressing all forms of family violence, including child maltreatment, intimate partner violence, and elder abuse. The site offers information on statistics, existing and pending legislation, publications, State and local programs, training and technical assistance, and funding opportunities. The resources can be accessed at www.ncjrs.org/family_violence/summary.html.

Additional Resources for Research and Practice

Research

Practice

Related Items

Read more about the link between domestic violence and child maltreatment in previous issues of Children's Bureau Express:

Issue Date: 10 2003
Section: Child Welfare Research
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=46&articleid=716


Strategies and Tools for Practice

CASASTART Program Helps Deter Drug Use and Violent Behavior in At-Risk Youth

CASASTART (Striving Together to Achieve Rewarding Tomorrows), a program of the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) at Columbia University, helps high-risk preadolescents resist alcohol, tobacco, and illegal drugs and avoid violent behavior. Its effectiveness has been demonstrated by an independent outside evaluator, and it was recently featured on the Promising Practices Network as a "proven" program (www.promisingpractices.net/program.asp?programid=107).

CASASTART's goals are to provide youth with the services and support they need to become productive, law-abiding citizens and to create a safer environment for adolescents and their families through the reduction of crime and illegal drugs in their neighborhoods. To attain these goals, CASA brings together key stakeholders in a community, including families, schools, law enforcement agencies, and social service and health agencies.

Individuals are identified for participation based on three areas of risk: family risk, which includes violence or disintegration; personal risk, which includes being a victim of abuse or neglect; or school risk. Each participant receives case management services as well as social support, family services, education services, after-school and summer activities, mentoring, community policing/enhanced enforcement, juvenile justice intervention (if needed), and incentives.

Research found, 1 year after program completion, CASASTART participants were significantly less likely than a control group to report:

CASA began the program in 1992 with funding provided by three constituent agencies of the U.S. Department of Justice and several national foundations. From 1992 to 1995 the program was tested in six cities. It currently operates in nearly 40 schools around the country.

More information about CASASTART can be found on the CASA website at http://www.casacolumbia.org/newsletter1458/newsletter_show.htm?doc_id=10725 (Editor's note: this link is no longer available).

Related Items

Read more about the link between childhood maltreatment and later substance abuse in previous issues of Children's Bureau Express:

Issue Date: 10 2003
Section: Strategies and Tools for Practice
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=46&articleid=720


New Resource for Preventing Youth Homelessness

Youth exiting foster care are at increased risk for future homelessness, often due to a lack of independent living or supportive services to help them maintain stable housing. The National Alliance to End Homelessness recently launched a new Web resource to inform and support those working to prevent youth homelessness, with a focus on youth involved with child welfare and juvenile justice. The Ending Youth Homelessness site (www.endhomelessness.org/youth) features effective strategies and programs as well as links to research and other resources on the topic.

Programs featured on the site include:

Information about featured practices includes services provided, sources of funding, and program contacts for further information.

Related Items

A recorded Webcast of a recent Leadership to End Homelessness audio conference on youth homelessness can be found on the PATH (Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness) website at www.pathprogram.samhsa.gov/naeh.asp.

Read more about services for youth aging out of foster care in previous issues of Children's Bureau Express:

Issue Date: 10 2003
Section: Strategies and Tools for Practice
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=46&articleid=721


Resources

Strengths, Challenges, and Needs of Kinship Caregivers

In 2000, almost 4 million children were living with relatives other than their parents. Two new publications highlight the unique challenges facing these caregivers.

A new report from Casey Family Programs National Center for Resource Family Support, The Kinship Report: Assessing the Needs of Relative Caregivers and the Children in Their Care, presents a balanced view of kinship care in the United States. Through literature reviews and interviews, the report:

The full report and an executive summary are available on the Casey Family Programs website at www.casey.org/Resources/Archive/Publications/KinshipReport.htm

The National Endowment for Financial Education teamed with the Child Welfare League of America (CWLA) to produce a new publication for families, Sticking Together: Kinship Care and Financial Care. This new publication helps families better understand and be prepared for the challenges and rewards involved in kinship care. Highlights include advice on day-to-day issues such as cooking and clothing, legal issues such as family reunification and legal guardianship, and financial issues such as preserving retirement saving and estate planning.

Copies of the publication (Item #8986) are available free (requestors must pay for shipping) from CWLA by calling (800) 407-6273 or online at www.cwla.org/pubs.

Related Item

A new brief from the Urban Institute, Identifying and Addressing the Needs of Children in Grandparent Care (www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=310842), focuses specifically on grandparent caregivers.

Issue Date: 10 2003
Section: Resources
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=46&articleid=1981


Recruiting Students Into the Child Welfare Field

Many child welfare agencies face challenges recruiting and maintaining an effective workforce. A new publication from The Haworth Press Inc., Charting the Impacts of University-Child Welfare Collaboration, addresses the process of preparing a professional workforce, including collaborations between social work educators and public child welfare agencies that have led to innovative changes in curricula and practice. Topics include determining a graduate's emotional capacity for child welfare service; delivering educational content in human behavior in the social environment courses; and using design teams to promote practice innovations, systems change, and cross-systems change.

Copies of Charting the Impact of University-Child Welfare Collaboration are available in both hard cover ($49.95) and soft cover ($29.95) from The Haworth Press at www.haworthpress.com/Store/Product.asp?sku=4828.

Related Items

Read more about child welfare workforce development in previous issues of Children's Bureau Express (http://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov):

Issue Date: 10 2003
Section: Resources
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=46&articleid=1982


2004 Public Human Services Directory

The 2004 Public Human Services Directory is now available from the American Public Human Services Association (APHSA). The updated directory provides accurate and reliable information that reflects changes brought about by the November 2002 elections. Information includes:

The directory is available for $120 for APHSA members, $135 for nonmembers, or $155 for international requests. The information in the directory will stay current with periodic free updates available on the APHSA website. For ordering information or to view a sample page of the directory, visit the APHSA website at www.aphsa.org/Publications/PublicDirectory.asp.

Issue Date: 10 2003
Section: Resources
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=46&articleid=1983


"Next Generation Grants" Available

The Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) recently announced the availability of approximately $4 million for Next Generation Grants to nonprofit organizations (such as public charities, faith-based and secular community organizations, private foundations, and schools). The grants will provide seed money to help new and startup organizations, as well as established organizations proposing new projects or programs, plan and implement new service programs that have the potential for becoming national in scope. Proposals and supporting materials are due November 17, 2003.

Grants will fund innovative strategies to engage volunteers in service that results in measurable outcomes for both beneficiaries and participants. Innovative models should fall under at least one of three service areas:

For additional information and concept paper guidelines visit the CNCS website at www.cns.gov/whatshot/notices.html. (Editor's note: this link is no longer available.)

Issue Date: 10 2003
Section: Resources
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=46&articleid=1984


Online Funding Tools

Seeking additional sources of funding in these tight fiscal times? These websites may help:

Connect for Kids' "Toolkit for Funding" (www.connectforkids.org/) offers nonprofit organizations valuable guidance for finding and securing funding. Grant information is provided for a variety of topical areas, including child care, children's health, children's mental health, juvenile justice, substance abuse, and special needs. The toolkit includes:

The Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) offers a brief guide to writing successful grants on its website. The publication offers tips for:

Find the guide on the CPB website at www.cpb.org/grants/grantwriting.html.

Issue Date: 10 2003
Section: Resources
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=46&articleid=1985


Training and Conferences

New Training Curriculum Helps Involve Fathers in Their Children's Lives

The National Family Preservation Network (NFPN) recently released a first-of-its-kind Fatherhood Training Curriculum to help child welfare professionals engage fathers more effectively. After a 2-year study of the child welfare system, NFPN concluded the system was primarily geared toward mothers and their children, leaving fathers largely out of the picture. NFPN uncovered no written policies, resources, or training curricula in the child welfare system to help involve fathers in their children's lives. The new 70-page curriculum was created to fill that gap.

Topics covered by the curriculum include:

More information about the curriculum can be found on the NFPN website at http://www.nfpn.org/fatherhood/training_curriculum.php. The curriculum costs $50 and can be ordered online from NFPN at http://www.nfpn.org/products/ or by writing to:

Priscilla Martens, Executive Director
National Family Preservation Network
3971 North 1400 E.
Buhl, ID 83316

Related Items

Read more about the role of fathers in previous issues of Children's Bureau Express:

Issue Date: 10 2003
Section: Training and Conferences
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=46&articleid=712


Conferences

14th National Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect

Couldn't make it to the 14th National Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect in April? Saw a great session, and wish you could remember whom to contact for more information? Check out the new resources available on the conference website (http://nccanch.acf.hhs.gov/profess/conferences/cbconference/index.cfm). Materials are now available for more than 40 presentations, as well as transcripts and streaming videos from most plenary sessions. Presentation abstracts and presenter contact information also are available for all sessions.

Upcoming national conferences on adoption and child welfare through January 2004 include:

November 2003

December 2003

January 2004

Further details about national and regional child welfare conferences can be found in the "conferences" section on the National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information website at http://nccanch.acf.hhs.gov/profess/conferences/index.cfm.

Further details about national and regional adoption conferences can be found in the "conferences" section on the National Adoption Information Clearinghouse website at http://naic.acf.hhs.gov/general/conferences/index.cfm.

Issue Date: 10 2003
Section: Training and Conferences
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=46&articleid=725



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