Children's Bureau Express02 2005 | Vol. 6, No. 1

Table of Contents
 

News From the Children's Bureau

  • Leavitt Confirmed as New Secretary of Health and Human Services
  • 15th National Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect
  • Dr. Wade Horn Addresses United Nations
  • Barriers and Promising Approaches to Foster Care Adoption
  • Promising Strategies to Strengthen Tribal Families
  • New Releases in the OCAN User Manual Series
  • Cultural Competence Training

Child Welfare Research

  • System or Policy Issues Cause Majority of Foster Care Placement Changes
  • Worker Perceptions of Neglect of American Indian Children

Strategies and Tools for Practice

  • A Model for Preparing Children for Permanency
  • Improving the Handling of Dual Jurisdiction Cases
  • Toolkit for Community-Based Child Welfare Services

Resources

  • Evidence-Based Practice and Child Maltreatment Services
  • Child-Only TANF for Children in Relative Care
  • Innovations in Child Welfare Across America
  • Using Interagency Collaboration to Deliver Part C Services to Infants and Toddlers
  • Family Strengthening Policy Center Website Launches
  • Online Parent Leadership Network
  • Supporting Evidence-Informed Practice With Children and Families
  • Faith-Based Organizations Face Challenges in Accessing Funding
  • Courses in Fundraising Through Indiana University--Close to Home
  • Post-High School Scholarships for Foster Youth

Training and Conferences

  • Online Resource for Child Welfare Training
  • Conferences

News From the Children's Bureau

Leavitt Confirmed as New Secretary of Health and Human Services

Michael O. Leavitt, former Administrator for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), was confirmed by the Senate on January 26, 2004, to be President George W. Bush's new Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS). Leavitt replaces Tommy Thompson, who was Secretary during President Bush's first term.

Prior to leading the EPA, Leavitt was the governor of Utah. During his tenure, Utah was widely regarded as one of the best-managed State governments in the country. In the area of child welfare, Governor Leavitt oversaw dramatic increases in funding for child welfare services, as well as reductions in the time children spent in foster care. He doubled the number of Utah's child welfare caseworkers and equipped these workers with key technology tools, including a state-of-the-art child welfare management information system.

In nominating Leavitt, President Bush called him "an ideal choice to lead one of the largest departments of the United States Government" and noted that HHS "touches the life of every person in this country." The President also praised Leavitt as a "man of great compassion."

A biography of the new Secretary can be found on the HHS website at http://www.hhs.gov/secretary/about/index.html.

Issue Date: 02 2005
Section: News From the Children's Bureau
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=61&articleid=923


15th National Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect

Register now for the 15th National Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect, April 18 to 23, 2005, in Boston, MA. The theme of this year's conference is "Supporting Promising Practices and Positive Outcomes: A Shared Responsibility." The conference offers excellent opportunities for promoting new working relationships, exchanging information on research, and reviewing practice issues and model programs. The Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children is the local host agency.

The Children's Bureau, the Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, and their co-sponsors have developed a broad mix of interactive educational sessions. More than 150 Workshops, Skills Seminars, Roundtables, and Poster Sessions are offered in six categories:

Visit the conference website at http://nccanch.acf.hhs.gov/profess/conferences/cbconference/index.cfm (Editor's note: Link no longer active) for easy, online registration and additional information about the plenary speakers, preconference seminars, special events, experiential learning opportunities, and a sample of the workshop sessions. Register by February 28 to receive a discount.

For more information about the conference and conference registration, call 703-528-0435 or email to 15conf@paltech.com.

Issue Date: 02 2005
Section: News From the Children's Bureau
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=61&articleid=908


Dr. Wade Horn Addresses United Nations

Dr. Wade Horn, Assistant Secretary for Children and Families at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, addressed the United Nations General Assembly on December 6, 2004, at a celebration of the 10th anniversary of the International Year of the Family. Dr Horn spoke on the relationship between the state and the family, emphasizing the government's obligation to protect the family as an institution.

In describing the principles that guide family policy in America, Dr. Horn noted four government obligations:

Dr. Horn concluded his remarks by saying, " . . . governments ought to honor and support the family as the most critical structure for insuring the well-being of children who are, after all, our future."

The full text of Dr. Horn's speech can be found on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Global Health website at www.globalhealth.gov/IYF_Horn_120604.shtml (Editor's note: Link no longer active).

Issue Date: 02 2005
Section: News From the Children's Bureau
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=61&articleid=909


Barriers and Promising Approaches to Foster Care Adoption

Last year's release of data from the Child and Family Services Reviews (CFSRs) for all 50 States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico provided the most comprehensive information to date on how States handle child welfare, including foster care adoption. Now, the Urban Institute has taken the CFSR information on foster care adoption one step further by compiling a State-by-State analysis of the data, highlighting both the barriers that States face and the promising approaches that many have developed in their efforts to place children from foster care into permanent adoptive homes. In addition, this report condenses the CFSR information on foster care adoption into an easily readable format that highlights both national trends and State practices.

The Urban Institute's report draws from the ratings each State received on seven adoption-related items on their CFSRs, as well as from the supporting text for the ratings, statewide assessments, and Program Improvement Plans. Using this information, barriers to foster care adoption were found to occur most commonly in five areas:

  1. Termination of parental rights (TPR) proceedings, where barriers include insufficient prior services and reluctance by courts and agencies to terminate if an adoptive home has not been identified.
  2. Recruitment of adoptive homes, where barriers include difficulty in finding homes for children with special needs and in finding homes that reflect the diversity of the children.
  3. Child welfare case management, where barriers include staff turnover and insufficient staff training.
  4. Court case management, where barriers include crowded dockets and lack of communication with child welfare agencies.
  5. Establishment or change of permanency goal, where barriers include maintaining a goal of reunification for too long and preferring a permanency goal of long-term foster care over adoption.

A variety of promising approaches to address barriers to adoption were reported in the States' CFSRs. These promising approaches were found most commonly in five areas:

  1. Recruitment of adoptive homes, where approaches include conducting extensive recruiting campaigns and collaborating with other agencies.
  2. Child welfare case management, where approaches include reorganizing staff to create adoption units and providing staff training.
  3. Approval of adoptive homes, where approaches include dual-licensing of foster/adoptive parents and contracting out the approval process.
  4. Permanency hearings, where approaches include the use of tracking systems and Court Improvement Project Bench Books.
  5. Postadoption services, where approaches include the establishment of adoption subsidies and postadoption services.

The full report, Foster Care Adoption in the United States: A State by State Analysis of Barriers and Promising Approaches, can be found on the Urban Institute's website:

www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/411108_FosterCareAdoption.pdf (PDF 4.03 MB)

The report was commissioned by the National Adoption Day Coalition, which consists of the Alliance for Children's Rights, Casey Family Services, Children's Action Network, Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute, Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption, Freddie Mac Foundation, and Target Corporation.

Issue Date: 02 2005
Section: News From the Children's Bureau
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=61&articleid=910


Promising Strategies to Strengthen Tribal Families

On November 17, 2004, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Administration for Children and Families (ACF) released a series of reports on the Promoting Safe and Stable Families program. The reports reveal ways that greater State flexibility in Federal funding could strengthen the abilities of tribal families to care for their children.

The reports also highlight promising practices tribes have adopted to meet unique challenges they face in managing services to strengthen tribal families, children, and youth. A major finding is that State flexibility in funding is critical in order for tribes to implement the best programs according to their unique history and circumstances.

Promising strategies to strengthen tribal families include:

The reports can be viewed online at the following links:

The full press release can be viewed at www.acf.hhs.gov/news/press/2004/pssf.htm.

Issue Date: 02 2005
Section: News From the Children's Bureau
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=61&articleid=911


New Releases in the OCAN User Manual Series

The Office on Child Abuse and Neglect (OCAN) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has recently released two more publications in its popular User Manual series. The first, Supervising Child Protective Services Caseworkers, provides the foundation for effective supervisory practice in child protective services (CPS). It describes the roles and responsibilities of the CPS supervisor, and it offers practice-oriented advice on how to carry out supervisory responsibilities effectively. Best practices and critical issues in supervisory practice are underscored throughout. Topics include the nature of CPS supervision, building staff capacity, supervisory feedback, clinical supervision, and recruitment and retention. While the manual is designed primarily for CPS supervisors and administrators, it also is relevant to other child welfare supervisors.

The second new User Manual, Child Protection in Families Experiencing Domestic Violence, looks at the problem of domestic violence in families. While system responses are primarily targeted towards adult victims of abuse, increasing attention is focused on the children who witness domestic violence. Studies estimate that 10 to 20 percent of children are at risk for exposure to domestic violence. Research also indicates that children exposed to domestic violence are at an increased risk of being abused or neglected. This manual provides background on this complex topic and addresses many practice issues, including the overlap between child maltreatment and domestic violence, modifying child protection practice with families experiencing domestic violence, enhancing caseworker safety and support in child protection cases involving domestic violence, and building collaborative responses for families experiencing domestic violence.

Another recent title in the User Manual series is The Role of Educators in Preventing and Responding to Child Abuse and Neglect. This manual examines the roles that teachers, school counselors, school social workers, school nurses, special education professionals, administrators, and other school personnel have in helping maltreated children.

These publications, as well as other titles in the User Manual series, are available through the website of the National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information:

www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/usermanual.cfm

Issue Date: 02 2005
Section: News From the Children's Bureau
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=61&articleid=2341


Cultural Competence Training

A new family support resource on cultural competence has been made available by the National Resource Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention (FRIENDS).This training tool, "Introduction to Cultural Competence," includes a facilitator's guide, PowerPoint presentation, and list of resources. The main component is the 33-slide PowerPoint presentation that addresses a variety of topics, including:

In addition to the training tool on cultural competence, the FRIENDS' website offers new factsheets that explore Native Americans and child welfare, parent support groups, and fatherhood topics. The cultural competence training tool and factsheets are available on the FRIENDS website:

http://friendsnrc.org/cbcap-priority-areas/cultural-competence

Issue Date: 02 2005
Section: News From the Children's Bureau
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=61&articleid=922


Child Welfare Research

System or Policy Issues Cause Majority of Foster Care Placement Changes

A study of 580 children in San Diego's foster care system found that more than 70 percent of placement changes were due to issues related to systems or policies, while only 20 percent were due to issues related to children's behavior.

Existing literature often links a child's behavioral problems with placement disruption, but few studies have examined reasons for placement changes in a systematic way. The current study involved children between the ages of 2 and 16 who were in the foster care system between May 1990 and October 1991 and were in placement for at least 5 months. Nearly three-quarters of the children were in out-of-home care for the first time, and the average length of time in out-of-home care was approximately 16 months. As a group, these children experienced more than 2,200 placement changes during the study period.

Findings indicate that the vast majority of children (94 percent) experienced a placement change due to system or policy-related issues. These included moving a child to a less restrictive setting, placing a child with kin, or placing the child in closer proximity to biological parents. Behavioral issues were the cause of approximately 20 percent of placement changes, followed by issues with the foster family (8 percent) and issues with the biological parents (2 percent).

Further analysis showed that placement changes due to behavioral issues were more likely to occur within the first 100 days of entering the foster care system. Other predictors of behavior-related placement changes included:

Findings also indicate that children placed in kinship care were less likely to experience behavior-related placement than those placed in other types of out-of-home care. Moreover, system- or policy-related placement changes were not associated with behavior-related placement changes.

Based on these results, the authors conclude that some children may enter foster care with attributes or conditions that put them at risk for a behavior-related placement change. Further, they suggest that these children should receive targeted interventions to reduce the risk of behavior-related placement changes.

The complete article, "Why Do Foster Care Placements Disrupt? An Investigation of Reasons for Placement Change in Foster Care," is available in the December 2004 issue of Social Service Review. Copies can be obtained online for a fee:

www.jstor.org/pss/30013213

Issue Date: 02 2005
Section: Child Welfare Research
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=61&articleid=912


Worker Perceptions of Neglect of American Indian Children

Data collected from the 1995-1999 National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (NCANDS) indicate differences in child welfare workers' perceptions of and responses to the neglect of American Indian children compared to the neglect of White children. This is the conclusion of a recent study that compared a matched set of 9,080 American Indian children and 8,628 White children, all of whom were identified as victims of neglect. According to the NCANDS data, which were collected by State and county (usually, non-Indian) child welfare workers, the neglect of American Indian children was more often associated with alcohol abuse of the caretaker or of the child, violence in the family, and family receipt of public assistance. The neglect of White children was more often associated with child or adult mental or physical problems and inadequate housing. In addition, discrepancies in child welfare responses were found in the high percentage of Indian children who received foster care placement and juvenile court petitions, which contrasted with the high percentage of White children who received family preservation services.

The study suggests that mainstream child welfare workers may be unfamiliar with Native American culture and practices, and this may impact their responses to potential cases of neglect in American Indian children. The data in the NCANDS appear to confirm that direct participation of Indian nations in child protective investigations, treatment, and data collection is needed in order to obtain accurate numbers and characteristics of abused and neglected American Indian children and to ensure appropriate, culturally sensitive responses.

The complete article, "Are They Really Neglected? A Look at Worker Perceptions of Neglect Through the Eyes of a National Data System," is available in the September 2004 issue of the First Peoples Child and Family Review: A Journal on Innovation and Best Practices in Aboriginal Child Welfare Administration, Research, Policy and Practice. Copies are available online:

www.fncfcs.com/sites/default/files/online-journal/vol1num1/Fox_pp73-82.pdf (PDF 693 KB)

Issue Date: 02 2005
Section: Child Welfare Research
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=61&articleid=913


Strategies and Tools for Practice

A Model for Preparing Children for Permanency

A new model presents an easy-to-remember method for preparing children in temporary out-of-home care for their transition to permanency of any type (reunification, kinship care, adoption, or permanent legal custodianship). The "3-5-7 model" involves the exploration of three tasks and five questions, using seven critical skills by the child welfare worker. This method provides tools and language to help child welfare professionals and foster parents assess children's readiness for permanency and to help the children reconcile their past losses.

The completion of three tasks by the child is designed to show where the child is in the resolution process. The tasks are:

The completion of these tasks is aided by answering five questions:

The worker makes use of seven critical skills in preparing the child:

The author stresses the importance of life books as a critical tool in this process. The life book assists the child, worker, and families as they complete the tasks of clarification, integration, and self-actualization. As different sections of the life book are completed, the worker and family can identify the progress of the child in the preparation process for permanency.

In 2003, the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare, Office of Children and Youth, adopted the 3-5-7 model for all children in their child welfare system who were preparing for permanency. Activities and exercises for intervention techniques were formalized in a manual entitled Recipes for Success. Outcome-based research using pre- and posttest surveys of social workers who are implementing this model is under development.

An advantage of the 3-5-7 model is that it establishes a common language for those working with children in placement and moves the field toward standardizing practice in the preparation of children for permanency. Standardization of language and practice assures continuity in the preparation process for a child. Even if a child is moved or is assigned a new worker, other workers or families can resume the effort at the point of interruption so the child does not have to restart the entire process.

The full article, "The 3-5-7 Model: Preparing Children for Permanency," can be found in the February 2005 issue of Children and Youth Services Review or online:

http://humanservices.ucdavis.edu/academy/pdf/The357model.pdf

Issue Date: 02 2005
Section: Strategies and Tools for Practice
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=61&articleid=914


Improving the Handling of Dual Jurisdiction Cases

Research has established that there is a strong correlation between child maltreatment and juvenile delinquency. Moreover, it is not uncommon for the same youth to be simultaneously involved in both the child dependency and delinquency systems. These "dual jurisdiction" cases can present difficult challenges for both systems, yet in most jurisdictions there is little coordination or communication between the systems. This lack of coordination can lead to duplication of case management efforts and conflicting case plan goals and, ultimately, poor outcomes for the youth and his or her family.

A new technical assistance bulletin, When Systems Collide: Improving Court Practices and Programs in Dual Jurisdiction Cases, has been released by the National Center for Juvenile Justice (NCJJ). This bulletin attempts to identify promising court-based or court-linked practices that can effectively address the difficult challenges posed by dual jurisdiction cases. The authors surveyed 94 jurisdictions, conducted a literature review, and drew from their own experience in working with court systems to identify five categories of court practices that show promise in effective handling of dual jurisdiction cases. These categories include:

Some specific tools discussed include use of structured decision-making protocols, one-stop interagency assessment and screening centers that are modeled after the Children's Advocacy Centers (CACs) used for child abuse and neglect assessments, and combining dependency and delinquency hearings. Examples of successful court-based programs are highlighted throughout the bulletin.

The report was funded by a grant from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention of the U.S. Department of Justice. The publication is available from the NCJJ website:

http://nc.casaforchildren.org/files/public/community/judges/March_2010/Web_Resources/spring05_3.pdf (PDF - 451 KB)

Issue Date: 02 2005
Section: Strategies and Tools for Practice
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=61&articleid=915


Toolkit for Community-Based Child Welfare Services

The struggles and eventual success of one community's efforts to establish a community-based model for child welfare service delivery are told in the "Birth of the East River Family Strengthening Cooperative," a toolkit that documents lessons learned. With support from the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the Marshall Heights Community Development Organization led the effort in the District of Columbia's Ward Seven child welfare initiative that resulted in the formation of this cooperative in 1996. They were able to convene residents, social workers, government officials, and other stakeholders to combat the poverty, unemployment, and family stability that were contributing to child abuse and neglect.

The toolkit that was developed as a result of this collaboration tells the story of the Ward Seven community over 5 years, including background on the factors that gave rise to the need for reform, a chronology of the experiences that led to the cooperative, and the work of the cooperative in the community. The toolkit includes a video, discussion guide, and working paper on this case study. The toolkit offers lessons on:

For additional information or to order the "Birth of the East River Family Strengthening Collaborative" toolkit, visit the Marshall Heights Community Development Organization website at www.mhcdo.org. [Editor's note: item is no longer available. Find more information on the Collaborative at www.erfsc.org ]

Issue Date: 02 2005
Section: Strategies and Tools for Practice
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=61&articleid=916


Resources

Evidence-Based Practice and Child Maltreatment Services

Evidence-based practice (EBP) strives to bring child welfare and child maltreatment related services more in line with clinical science and with the current practices that have already been proven both safe and effective. A recent article published in Children and Youth Services Review examines EBP and its application to the field of child abuse and neglect services.

A summary is provided that contrasts traditional clinical practices and EPB. These differences are apparent in a variety of areas, including:

The article highlights two projects to identify EBPs for maltreated children and families and also provides a summary of selected EBP models that show promise in child abuse and neglect. These models cover six classes of services:

Issues in implementing EBPs in child maltreatment services are discussed in terms of barriers at various levels and suggestions for overcoming these barriers.

The full article, "Evidence-Based Treatments in Child Abuse and Neglect," appears in the November 2004 issue of Children and Youth Services Review, which can be found on the Elsevier website:

http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1016/j.childyouth.2004.08.008

Issue Date: 02 2005
Section: Resources
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=61&articleid=2342


Child-Only TANF for Children in Relative Care

A recent report examines what is known about children who receive Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and who live with relatives not receiving such assistance. These children in TANF child-only cases who live with relative caregivers occupy a hazy area between the TANF and child welfare service systems. They are exempt from certain TANF requirements, such as work requirements, but these exemptions mean that they are not aligned with the TANF agency's general goal of self-sufficiency. Moreover, because they may not have been identified specifically as victims of maltreatment, they are outside the child welfare system's protection, although they still may require services.

This report examined the demographics, circumstances, and needs of these children, as well as State responses to them. Findings are based on a literature review, analysis of two national surveys, and case studies of five States. Some key findings from this study are:

Further research is needed to map the overlapping issues of TANF and child welfare, assess the needs of both children and relative caregivers, and evaluate existing initiatives to serve children and relative caregivers.

This report was prepared by RTI International and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is available online:

http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/child-only04

Issue Date: 02 2005
Section: Resources
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=61&articleid=2343


Innovations in Child Welfare Across America

Underfunded programs, overworked staff, and bureaucracy are just a few of the issues that administrators of public and private child welfare programs face everyday. However, programs throughout the country are overcoming these obstacles in a variety of creative ways. Innovations in Child Welfare Across America is a collection of these promising practices that have been used by program directors and local stakeholders and have resulted in program reforms.

The report is broken into sections, beginning with "Reform Has Many Faces," an overview of various approaches to achieving child well-being, safety, and permanency in different States. The subsequent chapters take a more indepth look at specific types of reform. Some of the sections include:

The report also discusses how administrators can utilize existing services outside of their own systems, highlighting partnerships with community groups and collaboration with family support centers. The report also shows how the Internet can be a valuable resource for youth who live too far away from the locations where services are available.

This publication was produced as a special report by the editors of Child Protection Report. Information about ordering this report is available on the Business Publishers' website at www.bpinews.com 

[Editor's note: The link to this report is no longer available.]

Issue Date: 02 2005
Section: Resources
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=61&articleid=2344


Using Interagency Collaboration to Deliver Part C Services to Infants and Toddlers

The University of Colorado Health Sciences Center has developed a toolkit to help child welfare workers effectively utilize Part C services in addressing the needs of infants and toddlers in the child welfare system. Part C is a component of the Federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) that provides financial assistance to States to maintain a system of early intervention services for infant and toddlers with disabilities or developmental delays.

Published in 2001, Interagency Collaboration: A Guidebook for Child Welfare and Part C Agencies explains the services offered by Part C and child welfare agencies and emphasizes the importance of collaboration between advocacy groups, public agencies, physicians, mental health service providers, Early Head Start professionals, and Court Appointed Special Advocates. Specific topics include Federal, State, and local responsibilities in Part C and child welfare services; the role of parents and caseworkers; funding; legal processes; and the framework for collaboration between Part C and child welfare agencies. Suggestions for developing community plans also are provided.

The project was funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs, and is available here:

http://jfkpartners.org/documents/106059-Interagency-Guidebook-Revised.pdf (PDF 192 KB)

Issue Date: 02 2005
Section: Resources
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=61&articleid=2345


Family Strengthening Policy Center Website Launches

The Family Strengthening Policy Center website provides policy briefs and updates, news, and resources focused on strengthening families. The Center, an initiative of the National Assembly and funded by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, also allows users to subscribe to an E-Newsletter. The website can be found here:

www.nassembly.org/fspc

Related Item

Learn more about strengthening families with the Center for the Study of Social Policy's Protecting Children by Strengthening Families: A Guidebook for Early Childhood Programs:

www.cssp.org/uploadFiles/handbook.pdf (PDF 2.09 MB)

Issue Date: 02 2005
Section: Resources
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=61&articleid=2346


Online Parent Leadership Network

The recently created Parent Leadership Network online community allows parents across the country to connect with each other and discuss ways to develop and expand their leadership skills and opportunities. Created by Parents Anonymous® in partnership with the parents serving on the National Parent Leadership Team, the email group receives continuous direction from the Parent Leadership Team. Membership in the Parent Leadership Network is free, and registration can be completed at www.parentleadershipnetwork.org. (Editor's note: This link is no longer available. To join the Parent Leadership Network, which is now a Facebook group, visit http://parentsanonymous.org/parents-caregivers/parent-leadership-network/.)

Issue Date: 02 2005
Section: Resources
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=61&articleid=2347


Supporting Evidence-Informed Practice With Children and Families

Research in Practice, a UK-based project, promotes positive outcomes for children and families through the use of research evidence. The group achieves its mission by identifying effective methods of understanding and using research and by providing services to a collaborative network of committed agencies. Their work, developed with and for their partners, includes the website, network exchange, change projects, learning events, and publications. Learn more about their services on the website:

www.rip.org.uk

Issue Date: 02 2005
Section: Resources
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=61&articleid=2348


Faith-Based Organizations Face Challenges in Accessing Funding

 

A recent report by the Roundtable on Religion and Social Welfare Policy concluded that, despite policies encouraging Federal and State funding for faith-based organizations (FBOs) to provide social services, the fiscal conditions needed to increase reliance on FBOs are likely to be vulnerable to long-term trends. The report's authors examined 14 Federal programs that were likely to supply significant funds to FBOs. These included Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF), Foster and Adoption Assistance, and Homeless Assistance. To understand how funding from these programs fit into the larger human services system, these 14 funding streams were compared with Medicaid and the State Child Health Insurance Program (SCHIP), two major health programs that are much less accessible to FBOs.

Some of the major findings include:

The authors conclude that for these and other reasons, FBOs seeking social service funding should also look for additional funding sources.

The report, Funding Faith-Based Services in a Time of Fiscal Pressure, is a project of the Rockefeller Institute of Government and received support from the Pew Charitable Trusts. The report can be accessed online:

www.rockinst.org/pdf/faith-based_social_services/2004-10-funding_faith-based_social_services_in_a_time_of_fiscal_pressures.pdf (PDF 479 KB)

Issue Date: 02 2005
Section: Resources
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=61&articleid=2349


Courses in Fundraising Through Indiana University--Close to Home

Through its Fund Raising School, the Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University offers courses in 10 cities across the country on topics such as Basic Elements of Fundraising, Preparing Successful Grant Proposals, and Managing the Capital Campaign. Course locations include Chicago, Denver, Houston, Indianapolis, Minneapolis, San Francisco, Seattle, Washington, DC, and Winter Park, FL. The School offers advanced degrees in Philanthropic Studies, a Certificate in Fundraising Management, and customized training programs.

Applications for the fall semester are due by April 1. For more information on the program, specific courses, and locations, visit

www.philanthropy.iupui.edu/TheFundRaisingSchool

Issue Date: 02 2005
Section: Resources
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=61&articleid=2350


Post-High School Scholarships for Foster Youth

The National Foster Parent Association offers scholarships for foster youth who wish to further their education beyond high school, including college or university studies, vocational and job training, and correspondence courses (including the GED). Birth and adopted youth in foster homes are also eligible for scholarships.

Interested youth must complete an application, provide two letters of recommendation, and submit a 300-500 word essay on why they want to further their education and why they should be considered for the scholarship. Applications are due on March 31, 2005, and decisions will be announced by May 31, 2005. For more information, visit the National Foster Parent Association website at http://nfpaonline.org/youthscholarship.

Issue Date: 02 2005
Section: Resources
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=61&articleid=2351


Training and Conferences

Online Resource for Child Welfare Training

To meet the needs of professionals working to build and strengthen the child welfare workforce, the National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect and National Adoption Information Clearinghouse have created a new online resource: Child Welfare Workforce and Training Resources. Created with the help of the American Humane Association and child welfare training experts from across the country, this resource allows professionals to search for and find research on the child welfare workforce, training organizations, training curriculums, and other relevant training resources by topic.

Abstracts of reports, relevant websites, and other documents from the Clearinghouse Library from 2000 to the present are available in the following categories:

Selected curriculum and other training materials in the Clearinghouse Library from 2000 to the present are available for each of the following categories:

The Clearinghouse maintains information on education programs organized by training topic or location for the child welfare workforce and training organizations. Education programs for the child welfare workforce can be located through a searchable database of graduate programs in social work with a child welfare focus and links to graduate and undergraduate programs in social work. Training organizations can be located through a searchable database of national, tribal, and State organizations that offer child welfare training.

Visitors to the website are encouraged to update or submit new information and materials for inclusion in the searchable database, as well as communicate with other professionals interested in child welfare training.

[Editor's note: The above links are no longer available. For information about child welfare training, visit Child Welfare Information Gateway: www.childwelfare.gov/management/training ]

Issue Date: 02 2005
Section: Training and Conferences
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=61&articleid=920


Conferences

Upcoming national conferences on adoption and child welfare through May 2005 include:

March 2005

April 2005

May 2005

Further details about national and regional adoption and child welfare conferences can be found through the "Conference Calendar" feature on the Child Welfare Information Gateway at https://www.childwelfare.gov/calendar/.

Issue Date: 02 2005
Section: Training and Conferences
URL: https://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/index.cfm?event=website.viewArticles&issueid=61&articleid=921



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